Laura Hedgecock

Apr 172014
 
writing about memories or memoir writing

Simply writing about memories–preserving your stories–is easier than writing a memoir.

Memoir writing and writing about memories have a lot in common. Both are introspective, healing projects. Here’s how writing about memories is an easier project.

It’s Easier to Get Started

It’s easier to start writing about your memories. The process of memory collection is much less formal than memoir writing. Though the quality of the memories and stories may be the same, but the framework is looser.

Memoirists look to convey a theme or story about their life. Many struggle with wondering if they story is important enough. Further, memoir writing requires greater technical writing skills. Ideally, your personal story will read like a novel. It will have a beginning that grabs the reader, pacing, climax, and character development. Writing about memories—simply collecting your stories, allows you to share with loved ones without worrying about the NY Times bestseller list. Continue reading »

Apr 142014
 
Writing through glasses 3D

Wearing and writing through glasses? Your personality can bring a story alive. But, it also functions as a lens.

What glasses do you wear?

We’re all writing through glasses of some sort. Our world-view, personality, and life experiences affect our writing.[1] Intentionally or not, we provide readers with a filter or lens.

This means that when you write about your memories, your writing is the filter through which your loved ones will come to understand the episodes of your past.

Perhaps the question makes more sense now. What type of glasses do you wear? What type of filter to do you lend to your readers? Continue reading »

Apr 072014
 
childhood Memories include main drag

Hometown memories might include cruising the main drag. Photo credit Library of Congress PPOC.

We usually define “home” as a building. It’s our childhood home, or grandma’s house, or another place where we felt safe to grow. However, our hometown memories also play an important role in our stories. Even if you moved frequently, chances are that the towns and cities of your past still have a special place in your heart.

As you look back, write about your hometown memories. The following are some ideas on how to capture the essence of the setting of your childhood stories.

What you used to think

Remember, you’re not so much telling the story of you hometown as telling your story of growing up in it. Your feelings about your hometown memories are an integral and important part of your story. Continue reading »

Apr 012014
 

Craft Squad Blog Hop Welcome to The Craft Squad’s Monthly Blog Hop!  This month our theme is “Hoppity Hop Hop”! What does that make you think of? Easter? Spring? Kids bouncing off the walls? Family Moments?

See how “Hoppity Hop Hop” inspired our Craft Squad members. This month I’m the first stop on the blog hop. My blog is about preserving memories; scrapbooking and paper crafting can play a huge role in sharing precious memories. Continue reading »

Mar 272014
 
Preserving family history info and roots

Preserving family history information will help loved ones know who you are

“Let your roots show” isn’t something likely to go over well over drinks on a girls’ night out. However, the same comment might be warmly received by a group of family history buffs. They’d wonder how they could do that, short of getting their pedigree chart screen-printed on a sweatshirt.

Whether you’re a certified genealogist or just writing down a few stories, you need to let your roots show. Preserving family history information will be a true gift for loved ones. Knowing where you’ve come from will help loved ones understand who you are. Even if you haven’t been tracing your roots, there’s a lot you can do. Continue reading »

Mar 252014
 
Sharing your personality through writing

Sharing your personality through your stories might involve loosening the heart strings a little.

Make sure you’re sharing your personality along with your memories and stories. Telling your stories isn’t only about the past. It’s also about connecting with loved ones now—and into the future. Make sure you’re infusing accounts of long ago with your  feelings, character and individuality.

Sharing your Personality by Including your Feelings

It’s our feelings about our past that makes it so important to tell our stories.

Memoirist Marilyn Abildskov  notes, “There are many reasons to write, but one of the most time-honored is this: we have some strong feeling we want to convey. We miss the small red house of our childhood, the smell of our grandmother’s soap, the slant of our father’s handwriting, the perfect meal we had with someone in a seaside town many years ago. We write out of longing, out of memory, out of happiness, out of regret.”[1] Continue reading »

Mar 202014
 
Stories of pregnancy and childbirth through pictures

Love stories include stories of pregnancy and childbirth

Often, when we look at our parents’, grandparents’, and ancestors’ history, the stories of pregnancy and childbirth are sparse. Without an eye-witness account, these chapters of your family history often remain unwritten.

Ask your Relatives for Stories of Pregnancy and Childbirth

With today’s technology, it’s easy for moms- and dads-to-be to share the progress of pregnancy and the details of childbirth with the world. It’s a fun way to connect with loved ones that previous generations didn’t have.

Continue reading »

Mar 182014
 
writing good enough when no one is the master

Apparently, even Hemingway had his “Is my writing good enough? ” moments.

Whether or not we voice it, it’s something we all wonder. We ask ourselves “Is my writing good enough?” before we pick up a pen (or digital age equivalent), as we write, and before we hit the save button.

The question—the self-doubt—taunts us.

For who?

Here’s where I pull out my soap-box, especially if that nagging doubt is keeping you from telling your own stories. For whom are you writing? If you’re hoping to pen a best-seller or win a literary prize, there may be some merit to the question. If you’re writing down your memories to share with loved ones, there probably isn’t. Continue reading »

Mar 132014
 
Difficult decisions great stories

Even when you regret your choices, your process of making difficult decisions can make a great story (or two).

In part one, we looked at how to identify important life decisions to write about. In this post, we’ll look at the stories behind the choices we made.

The story behind a difficult decision can be as important (and interesting) as the decision itself. Great stories result from examining difficult decisions in hind-sight, relating how you arrived at your choices. In fact, this is a common theme among best-selling memoirs. (Click here for examples.)

Decision making process

One of my favorite quotes when I was a teen was “Not to decide is to decide.” But that was my goal, not my modus operandus. I was more likely to take the path of least resistance than I was to make a touch choice. Continue reading »

Mar 102014
 

use green to highlight winter beauty This month’s blog hop theme is “Brought to You by the Color Green.” Winter doesn’t have to be blue. I decided to use green to highlight winter beauty. To start at the beginning of the hop, please visit Stamp Patty’s at  http://www.stamppattys.com/2014/03/brought-to-you-by-color-green.html. If you’re coming from there, you’re in the right place.

Words alone seldom suffice to convey the beauty and mood of nature. In this project, color, photography, and art combine to highlight the beauty and serenity of one of the snowiest Michigan winters on record. Continue reading »

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