Guest Poster

Dec 042014
 
Wendy Parmley Shares Hope after Suicide

Author Wendy Parmley shares her story of finding Hope after Suicide — here in this post as well as in her recently released book.

I’m excited to have author Wendy Parmley share her insight with Treasure Chest of Memories readers. Wendy is an advocate for suicide prevention as well as for the support of loved ones left behind after a suicide. In this post, along with sharing her story of finding hope after suicide, she also opens up about the roles of her faith and sharing her story had in her physical and emotional healing.

I began writing my book nearly three years ago following a bicycle accident which left me unable to return to my nursing career because of the continued effects of a traumatic brain injury. During those dark days when I couldn’t get my brain to work, God spoke to my heart. I knew what my new work would be. My new work would be to tell the story of my angel mom – the story of her life, the story of her death, and the story of my healing journey. Continue reading »

May 122014
 
Jackie Wood Lost Memories

Guest Poster Jackie Wood tells her story of eight years of memories lost.

Nothing brings home the fact that memories matter more than hearing about someone who has lost his or her ability to remember. Today, I’m excited to have Jackie Wood tell her story of eight years of memories lost, a cautionary tale for us all. Her dedication to preserving precious moments is inspirational.

Ordinary everyday moments are what make our lives our own. These moments are what define who we are and what we do. The big moments are grand and exciting, but life happens in the little ordinary moments. These daily routines can blur together and be difficult to remember years, weeks, or even days later in the best of circumstances. For me it was especially difficult.

Two and a half years ago, I woke up to eight years of memories lost. That morning my brain, memories and reality were of our family in 2004 not 2011. In my mind, my daughter was five years old getting ready to start kindergarten. The reality was she was 13 and one year away from high school. Continue reading »

Apr 102014
 
Slave Info sheds light

Slave information from your family tree could enlighten other researchers.

I’m excited to introduce Valerie Hughes, today’s guest poster. Valerie, a professional genealogist, recently gained insight about what to do with slave information you encounter during your family tree research.

Will You Take The Challenge?  Share Slave History from your Family Tree.

About two months ago, I joined a Black Ancestry Group on Facebook. You may think this is an odd thing to do considering I am not black. However, I did it for a specific reason, to ask a question that had been plaguing me for a long time.  The following is the question that I finally asked. Continue reading »

Mar 312014
 
Adopted genealogy an individual journey

Adopted Genealogy: Every adoptee has a different story and every adoption has its own set of circumstances.

Today I’m excited to have blogger Yvette Porter Moore share her insight about family history research from an adoptee’s standpoint.

Being adopted sometimes intensifies the age-old adage “Who am I?” and “Where do I come from?” Adopted genealogy adds an extra layer of bricks and mortar to break-through. Most adoption records are sealed and not open to the forever “child,” who is now an adult.

My Story

Having reunited with my birth family about twenty-three years ago, I can still remember the process, and the feelings I experienced. Continue reading »

Feb 242014
 

Memories: Why We Repress Them & How to Recover Them

Unlocking or recovering repressed memories

Bobbi Parish-Logie addresses recovering repressed memories

Part two of a series by Bobbi Parish-Logie

Welcome back everyone to part two of my short series about memories from the perspective of neuroscience and mental health. Last week I talked about how our brain stores memories and why it represses them. This week let’s dive into how to recognize that we have repressed memories and how to recover them.

Our brain has varying degrees of repressing memories. Some are determined so dangerous to our emotional health that they are locked into compartments so tightly and so far away from anything that would trigger their recall that those memories aren’t ever intended to be recovered. Other memories that the mind has determined to be dangerous to our well-being in the moment but potentially safe to recall at a later date, will be locked away with a thread of their substance dangling from the box. At some point in the future, when the brain determines it is safe, it will allow that thread to be connected to a circumstance or experience that will pull that repressed memory from its box. Continue reading »

Feb 172014
 

Repressed memories forget me not Guest Poster Bobbi Parish Logie helps us understand repressed memories and how they are recovered.

I’m excited to introduce Bobbi Parish-Logie and the first of two guest posts on repressed and recovered memories. It’s a topic that can help all of us connect to our stories.

How the Brain Stores Memories

As a Mental Health Counselor who specializes in working Continue reading »