Bumper sticker covered car

Do you have something to say about yourself? Image by RHoch (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

How do you tell people who you are? How would you give them a bumper sticker synopsis of yourself? (Of course, you could ask why you’d want to do that as well. As Rob Walker argues, “…bumper stickers are about declaration, not dialogue.” But let’s put that aside and indulge in the exercise. Consider it a brainstorming activity.)

What Would your Bumper Sticker say?

If you could tell the world who you are in just a few words, what would you say? If you were forced to have a bumper sticker—even if you’re anti-bumper sticker like me– what would you put on it?

Are you such an open book that you’d have something on your bumper sticker that reveals who you really are? Or would it reveal a one-dimensional view of you?

Who or What matters to you

For years my sister has displayed two—not one—“I have a terrific kid” stickers on the back of her mini-van. She only has one kid. She claims her daughter added the second one for emphasis. In her daughter’s defense, she was little back then and who would expect that their mom would be driving the same minivan when she went to high school as when the sheriff’s department was giving out terrific kid stickers to 7 year-olds? Happily, my sister finally gave up her 200,000 mile +, 3 transmissions, re-welded-drivers-seat, and Takata airbag minivan a couple of months ago. She claims she’s on the lookout for the same sticker for the new car. She’ll probably find one.

Who are what matters to you the most? Why is it important to yell that from the rooftops?

What you’re comfortable with sharing

Some of us are more comfortable with sharing than others. Many people are at ease with a public persona, but still have a strong sense of privacy when it comes to their personal life. Many women my age, for instance, are a lot more comfortable sharing their “mom” status than anything else about themselves, even using pictures of their kids as their social media profile picture.

Would your bumper sticker synopsis of yourself be something that takes a stand? Or would it be something less likely to solicit an opposing viewpoint? This is my choice. I’d take the University of Michigan’s “I bleed Maize and Blue” and change it to “My Wallet Bleeds Maize and Blue.” I might even add an asterisk noting that it bleeds for in-state tuition. (We’re not rich, so don’t let that stop you from increasing my household income by buying my book.)

Who you’re not:

When would you like to have a name tag stating who or what you’re not?

When we had children at the same elementary school, people used to confuse me with my friend Kristin. In fact, it happened so often we still refer to each other as “Sis.”

When I was heading up the school science fair, Kristin wore a name tag that read “I’m not Laura Hedgecock.” (Truth be told, I made it for her. Kristin wasn’t looking forward to answering all the earnest little questioners and their parents with “I’m sorry, I’m not Laura Hedgecock.”)

For instance, what about politics? Does that ever make you want to have a name tag or bumper sticker that would distinguish you from the rest of your party?

Your Turn:

This makes a great writing prompt. Not just what you’d do, but why you’d choose to display that part of yourself. Why (or if) the decision would be hard. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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