May 292014
 

Lives of World War I Injuries Historians at London’s Imperial War Museum (IWM) are trying to preserve the stories of 8 million people. That’s how many World War I stories they estimate are in danger of being lost to “living” memory. And, that’s only counting those who served the British Commonwealth.

The “Great War” began on June 28, 1914. We’ve lost the lives of World War I–the veterans, survivors, nurses, and doctors of that war. In addition, the next generation—the children that knew their stories, are also aging. These stories are in danger of being lost to history. Continue reading »

May 012014
 
Questions for Ancestors Field Clark

If I could just get that interview, I ‘d have questions for ancestors

In my family tree, there are huge gaping holes in our family stories. I have so many questions for ancestors. If I could go back in time with a little voice recorder, there are quite a few of my ancestors I would want to  interview. I’d also have a few questions for my husband’s ancestors—after all, they, too, are my children’s progenitors.

Note: Keep in mind; stories don’t have to have happily-ever-after endings. Your questions for ancestors could lead to great stories about them!

Van Field Clark: “Are all Grandma’s war stories true?”

Van Field Clark was “Grandpa Clark” to my grandmother. As she collected her memories, she wrote down some of his Civil War stories, none of which I have been able to substantiate. Not only would I want to know if the stories are true, I would want to hear them first hand. Continue reading »

Apr 102014
 
Slave Info sheds light

Slave information from your family tree could enlighten other researchers.

I’m excited to introduce Valerie Hughes, today’s guest poster. Valerie, a professional genealogist, recently gained insight about what to do with slave information you encounter during your family tree research.

Will You Take The Challenge?  Share Slave History from your Family Tree.

About two months ago, I joined a Black Ancestry Group on Facebook. You may think this is an odd thing to do considering I am not black. However, I did it for a specific reason, to ask a question that had been plaguing me for a long time.  The following is the question that I finally asked. Continue reading »

Mar 312014
 
Adopted genealogy an individual journey

Adopted Genealogy: Every adoptee has a different story and every adoption has its own set of circumstances.

Today I’m excited to have blogger Yvette Porter Moore share her insight about family history research from an adoptee’s standpoint.

Being adopted sometimes intensifies the age-old adage “Who am I?” and “Where do I come from?” Adopted genealogy adds an extra layer of bricks and mortar to break-through. Most adoption records are sealed and not open to the forever “child,” who is now an adult.

My Story

Having reunited with my birth family about twenty-three years ago, I can still remember the process, and the feelings I experienced. Continue reading »

Mar 272014
 
Preserving family history info and roots

Preserving family history information will help loved ones know who you are

“Let your roots show” isn’t something likely to go over well over drinks on a girls’ night out. However, the same comment might be warmly received by a group of family history buffs. They’d wonder how they could do that, short of getting their pedigree chart screen-printed on a sweatshirt.

Whether you’re a certified genealogist or just writing down a few stories, you need to let your roots show. Preserving family history information will be a true gift for loved ones. Knowing where you’ve come from will help loved ones understand who you are. Even if you haven’t been tracing your roots, there’s a lot you can do. Continue reading »

Mar 202014
 
Stories of pregnancy and childbirth through pictures

Love stories include stories of pregnancy and childbirth

Often, when we look at our parents’, grandparents’, and ancestors’ history, the stories of pregnancy and childbirth are sparse. Without an eye-witness account, these chapters of your family history often remain unwritten.

Ask your Relatives for Stories of Pregnancy and Childbirth

With today’s technology, it’s easy for moms- and dads-to-be to share the progress of pregnancy and the details of childbirth with the world. It’s a fun way to connect with loved ones that previous generations didn’t have.

Continue reading »

Feb 032014
 
The Rest of the story of Vanburen Clark

Van Buren Field Clark, my great-great-grandfather

Stories matter. Not just the bare bones stories based on facts, but the rest of the story. Personalities, proclivities, relationships, and experiences are an important part of preserving your family history.

Flynn Coleman makes a good case for this in his article Only Connect: Why Your Story Matters. Huffington Post writers don’t usually need my help in stating their case, but just this once I’ll help Mr. Coleman out with an illustration.

I decided to compare what I know about my second great grandfather from research as opposed to my grandmother’s “Treasure Chest of Memories.” I hope that it will bring home the importance of sharing and documenting family stories. You won’t just be providing the rest of the story. You’ll be facilitating a connection between the family members, past and present. Continue reading »

Jan 222014
 
Pedigree chart's dry facts into stories

It’s not that hard to turn these dry facts into stories.

I admit the prospect of taking dry historical facts and turning them into stories that the rest of the family—much less the rest of the world—will find interesting is intimidating. It sounds like some literary alchemy or magic is called for.

Actually, it’s not really that hard. Continue reading »

Dec 172013
 
Story behind the name

What’s your story?

What’s the story behind your name? Sharing the story of your name often entails sharing stories of family heritage and relationships.

Who you were named after?

Often you’ll hear that a person was named after someone who meant a lot to their parents. It isn’t always a relative. Who was that person? What role did they play in your parents’ lives? What role did they play in your life?

Continue reading »

Oct 042013
 
Family History Month Graphic

Celebrate Family History Month

Family History Month isn’t just for genealogists. With these simple ideas, non-genealogists can honor an ancestor or learn about their family history.

Let’s say you haven’t caught the family history research bug (yet). You’re not into scouring grave yards. All those Ancestry.com commercials haven’t made you grab for the nearest device to “find your story.” That doesn’t mean you can’t join in the spirit of Family History month. Continue reading »