Sep 302014
 
Lists are not just for Santa

Lists aren’t just for the big guy with presents. Start making your own.

My scattered brain loves lists. They calm and organize my distractible why-did-I-come-into-this-room brain. When my brain isn’t preoccupied with finding my glasses or coffee cup, lists feed my creativity.

Lists can be the memory-collector’s best friend. To illustrate this point, I found myself making a list about making lists.

Lists help you remember

Lists, if you don’t forget where you put them, are more permanent than memory. They can become an Idea Bank to store your ideas. (Hmmm… That’s a section of Memories of Me: A Complete Guide to Telling and Sharing the Stories of Your Life. ) Continue reading »

Aug 212014
 
Throw back Thursday

Throw back Thursday: My boys and I

I keep seeing my life—well at least the last eighteen to twenty years of it—flash before my eyes.

It’s probably because my nest is emptying next week, as my youngest heads off to college. Everywhere I go, sweet memories creep into my peripheral vision, denying me focus. Part of me is sad that they’re just memories, that times have changed and the kids are grown. Part of me is grateful for their presence, however ephemeral. I like playing the old filmstrips.

Passing a soccer field reminds me of all the practices and games. As I ride my bike through a park, I remember countless days on the hiking trails, looking at bugs, running from bees, and ending up on the play structures. I remember watching my kids and their playmates swing and slide while talking to the other moms. Continue reading »

Jun 242014
 
What you were doing was right street sign

Those times when you knew what you were doing was right make great stories!

Have you ever had moments of extreme confidence—times in which you knew that what you were doing was right? As a person who, on her best days, still lacks confidence, such occasions of complete certainty have been relatively rare. On the other hand, the scarcity of those times makes them doubly precious.

The circumstances of knowing what you were doing was right make for great stories to share and pass down. They can give your readers great insight into your personality. Continue reading »

Apr 172014
 
Simply writing about memories --preserving your stories--is easier than writing a memoir.

Simply writing about memories–preserving your stories–is easier than writing a memoir.

Memoir writing and writing about memories have a lot in common. Both are introspective, healing projects. Here’s how writing about memories is an easier project.

It’s Easier to Get Started

It’s easier to start writing about your memories. The process of memory collection is much less formal than memoir writing. Though the quality of the memories and stories may be the same, but the framework is looser.

Memoirists look to convey a theme or story about their life. Many struggle with wondering if their story is important enough. Further, memoir writing requires greater technical writing skills. Ideally, your personal story will read like a novel. It will have a beginning that grabs the reader, pacing, climax, and character development. Writing about memories—simply collecting your stories, allows you to share with loved ones without worrying about the NY Times bestseller list. Continue reading »

Apr 072014
 
childhood Memories include main drag

Hometown memories might include cruising the main drag. Photo credit Library of Congress PPOC.

We usually define “home” as a building. It’s our childhood home, or grandma’s house, or another place where we felt safe to grow. However, our hometown memories also play an important role in our stories. Even if you moved frequently, chances are that the towns and cities of your past still have a special place in your heart.

As you look back, write about your hometown memories. The following are some ideas on how to capture the essence of the setting of your childhood stories.

What you used to think

Remember, you’re not so much telling the story of you hometown as telling your story of growing up in it. Your feelings about your hometown memories are an integral and important part of your story. Continue reading »

Mar 062014
 

Memories of voices from the past There’s probably a good reason that we wish for a phone call from Heaven. We crave to hear the voices of the people we love. We want to remember the things they said—and how they said it.

You don’t have to be mourning a loss to want to preserve memories of what he or she said. Capture your memories of voices from the past by writing down short descriptions of what your loved ones say or said. Continue reading »

Feb 272014
 
Writing about your earliest memory as a toddler

Writing about your earliest memory can be entertaining and revealing.

Writing about your earliest memory can present a challenge. Often, they’re not coherent. You might only remember a room, a noise, or impressions. However, writing about your earliest memory or memories and explaining why they matter can provide a meaningful glimpse into your childhood.

It’s fun to compare something we all share

It’s fun to compare your own early memory with the earliest memories of loved ones. Most of our earliest memories date back to age three of four, though some people have even earlier memories. Continue reading »

Feb 242014
 

Memories: Why We Repress Them & How to Recover Them

Unlocking or recovering repressed memories

Bobbi Parish-Logie addresses recovering repressed memories

Part two of a series by Bobbi Parish-Logie

Welcome back everyone to part two of my short series about memories from the perspective of neuroscience and mental health. Last week I talked about how our brain stores memories and why it represses them. This week let’s dive into how to recognize that we have repressed memories and how to recover them.

Our brain has varying degrees of repressing memories. Some are determined so dangerous to our emotional health that they are locked into compartments so tightly and so far away from anything that would trigger their recall that those memories aren’t ever intended to be recovered. Other memories that the mind has determined to be dangerous to our well-being in the moment but potentially safe to recall at a later date, will be locked away with a thread of their substance dangling from the box. At some point in the future, when the brain determines it is safe, it will allow that thread to be connected to a circumstance or experience that will pull that repressed memory from its box. Continue reading »

Feb 202014
 
Athlete with the agony of defeat

Since we’ve all have known the agony of defeat, it’s a great topic for memory sharing.

Life isn’t always about winning, so it makes sense that we’d want to write about the agony of defeat as well as about our accomplishments. In fact, these stories of missing the mark are often the ones that connect us to family members, resonating because we all know that agony of defeat.

However, the difference between a simple loss and an epic disappointment isn’t always self-apparent. For example, watching the Olympics it’s clear that for some athletes, making it to Sochi was the victory. For others, “winning” a silver medal is the agony of defeat. Continue reading »

Feb 172014
 

Repressed memories forget me not Guest Poster Bobbi Parish Logie helps us understand repressed memories and how they are recovered.

I’m excited to introduce Bobbi Parish-Logie and the first of two guest posts on repressed and recovered memories. It’s a topic that can help all of us connect to our stories.

How the Brain Stores Memories

As a Mental Health Counselor who specializes in working Continue reading »